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Hawaii Aviation | Photos of Bud Mars Flight

Photos of Bud Mars Flight

Bud Mars
The Curtiss B-18 biplane made of spruce, ash, bamboo, steel tubing and silk was piloted by J. C. Bud Mars. Mars took nine seconds to get airborne and climbed to 500 ft before landing safely.     The Curtiss B-18 biplane made of spruce, ash, bamboo, steel tubing and silk was piloted by J. C. Bud Mars. Mars took nine seconds to get airborne and climbed to 500 ft before landing safely. Mars is interviewed before his historic flight at Moanalua Polo Field. "I am proud to have been the first man to fly over these beautiful islands." Honolulu Advertiser 1-1-1911     Mars is interviewed before his historic flight at Moanalua Polo Field. "I am proud to have been the first man to fly over these beautiful islands." Honolulu Advertiser 1-1-1911 Bud Mars' biplane on the grass at Moanalua Field where approximately 3,000 people witnessed the first flight of a heavier than air machine over Hawaii soil.     Bud Mars' biplane on the grass at Moanalua Field where approximately 3,000 people witnessed the first flight of a heavier than air machine over Hawaii soil. Residents gather to watch the first flight in Hawaii by Bud Mars     Residents gather to watch the first flight in Hawaii by Bud Mars As the biplane with its gigantic wings swept over the grass field and rose into the air there was a general whoop of exultation and spontaneous applause from spectators.     As the biplane with its gigantic wings swept over the grass field and rose into the air there was a general whoop of exultation and spontaneous applause from spectators. Mars made several flights that day.     Mars made several flights that day. Mars made several flights that day.     Mars made several flights that day. JC Bud Mars' biplane on his history making flight was an entirely new machine which had never been in the air before. It was christened Skylark after its maiden flight.     JC Bud Mars' biplane on his history making flight was an entirely new machine which had never been in the air before. It was christened Skylark after its maiden flight. "The biplane swooped down like a monstrous hawk charging on its prey. . ." Honolulu Advertiser 1/1/1911     "The biplane swooped down like a monstrous hawk charging on its prey. . ." Honolulu Advertiser 1/1/1911 Promoters sold tickets to Honolulu spectators for $1 each. Some 3,000 people paid the administrative charge, and hundreds of others watched from nearby hillsides. Mars landed in the center of the polo field after the flight and was interviewed and photographed by the press. Mars was disgusted that so many viewed his flight without paying. He left the islands in early January 1911 for Asia, discouraged that he hadn't covered his costs. next 5 items »     Promoters sold tickets to Honolulu spectators for $1 each. Some 3,000 people paid the administrative charge, and hundreds of others watched from nearby hillsides. Mars landed in the center of the polo field after the flight and was interviewed and photographed by the press. Mars was disgusted that so many viewed his flight without paying. He left the islands in early January 1911 for Asia, discouraged that he hadn't covered his costs. next 5 items » Mars landed in the center of the polo field after the flight and was interviewed and photographed by the press.     Mars landed in the center of the polo field after the flight and was interviewed and photographed by the press. Mars was disgusted that so many viewed his flight without paying. He left the islands in early January 1911 for Asia, discouraged that he hadn't covered his costs.     Mars was disgusted that so many viewed his flight without paying. He left the islands in early January 1911 for Asia, discouraged that he hadn't covered his costs. "I find your Hawaiian air currents rather tough ones, but everything else was lovely." Honolulu Advertiser January 1, 1911.     "I find your Hawaiian air currents rather tough ones, but everything else was lovely." Honolulu Advertiser January 1, 1911. Paying customers watch as J. C. Bud Mars makes the first airplane flight in Hawaii on December 31, 1910.     Paying customers watch as J. C. Bud Mars makes the first airplane flight in Hawaii on December 31, 1910. J. C. Bud Mars making first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua).     J. C. Bud Mars making first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua). J. C. Bud Mars makes the first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua)     J. C. Bud Mars makes the first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua) J. C. Bud Mars makes the first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua).     J. C. Bud Mars makes the first flight in Hawaii December 31, 1910 in Honolulu (Moanalua).